Category Archives: Twitter

Lawyers Attracting Twitter Followers

Kevin O’Keefe has some good ideas about lawyer use of Twitter, including:

  1. Your Twitter account should be in your own name. Not your law firm’s name, not your blog’s name, and not in a pseudonym. People trust people. As a lawyer you need all the trust you can get.
  2. Focus on a niche. Random tweeting about various legal, business, and social news and information can end up just being noise among all the other tweets. Tweeting on a niche, ie, legal ethics, will become a clear signal to relevant users. As others with an Interest in legal ethics start re-tweeting what you are sharing you’ll pick up a following. You’ll also find Twitter recommending that others with an interest in legal ethics follow you.
  3. A RSS news reader is a must. Follow sources of interest (blogs and news sites) and keywords and phrases of Interest. Feedly is a good one to use. I use Mr. Reader hooked up to Feedly on my iPad. Your reader will collect news and info leaving you with plenty of items to Tweet.
  4. Use a news reader that enables sharing to Twitter. Most readers, ala Feedly or Mr. Reader, allow you to share items directly from the reader with the push of a button or two. It’s too hard copying and pasting items into Twitter.
  5. Give attribution to the source in your tweet. Leave the Twitter handle of the source of the blog post or news story you are sharing. That way the source, often influential, will see you. They’ll often thank you.
  6. Leave enough characters for a retweet. A tweet can only be 140 characters. A retweet includes “RT” and your twitter handle, ie, @kevinokeefe. A retweet of my tweet takes 15 characters, “RT @kevinokeefe:,” so I try to limit my tweets to 125 characters. That way they’re easy to retweet.

via Getting followers on Twitter : What’s a lawyer to do?.

Social Media vs. Client Confidentiality

Michael Downey’s article in the most recent issue of the ABA Law Practice Management’s Law Practice magazine raises an issue concerning the effects of social media on client confidentiality:

[T]he constant push for lawyers to post Internet content—blogging, tweeting and the like—substantially increases the risks to client information.

A great illustration of a lawyer generating Internet content to attract clients is Hunter v. Virginia State Bar, No. 121472 (Va. Feb. 28, 2013). In Hunter, a lawyer blogged about criminal cases he handled for clients without the clients’ permission.

A hearing panel found this unethical, but the Virginia Supreme Court reversed, concluding that a lawyer could report on publicly disclosed information at a client’s criminal proceeding without client consent. “To the extent [this] information is aired in a public forum,” the Hunter court explained, “privacy considerations must yield to First Amendment protections.”

Sign of the future? Hunter’s holding may be rejected as unpersuasive by other courts. Yet Hunter serves as a powerful reminder that lawyers and law firms may be inclined to promote their firms by revealing client confidences.

No doubt, social media create new ways in which lawyers can commit ethics violations, and new opportunities for them to do so. However, these pressures are not qualitatively different from those of years past. Unethical lawyers could always breach client confidences in articles, speeches, or even informal marketing pitches. Ethical lawyers didn’t then and won’t now.

Awareness of any intensified risks is great, and I commend Mr. Downey, but let’s be careful to avoid letting welcome conscience-raising descend into what Kevin O’Keefe has correctly described as “lawyers scaring lawyers from using social media.”

Ambrogi’s Tips for Finding Lawyers on Twitter

Bob Ambrogi has some tips for finding lawyers on Twitter:

When lawyers who are new to Twitter ask me how to find other lawyers to follow, I point them to either of two directories, LexTweet, operated by the folks at legal blog company LexBlog, and LegalBirds, part of the Justia legal portal. Both of these enable you to find lawyers on Twitter by popularity and location. In addition, LegalBirds organizes them by practice areas, so if you want to find an estate-planning lawyer on Twitter, you can.