Category Archives: Law Firm Marketing

Query One: “Is It Responsive?” (Lawyerist Best Law Firm Websites Poll)

Vote in Lawyerist’s Best Law Firm Websites Competition, 2014 Edition. The only criterion suggested is notable:

Responsive web design turned out to play a big factor in getting to the top ten. A responsive website should look good on any screen, from a big desktop display to a smartwatch. Law websites still have a way to go on this, though. Many great-looking nominations — including some websites built in the last year — wound up in the discard pile because they are not responsive.

Blogs v. Social Media

My friend Kevin O’Keefe’s Real Lawyers Have Blogs is a consistent source of good ideas about lawyer use of the Internet, with a post comparing the impact of social media and blogging a recent highlight. One anecdote in particular rings true:

One law firm marketing professional told me today that when he suggests Twitter with lawyers in his firm he gets a look like he is suggesting MySpace. In a presentation yesterday I asked an audience of about fifty lawyers how many use Twitter. One sheepishly raised his hand to shoulder height.

Some might discount Kevin’s perspective because his business supports blogs for lawyers. That would be a mistake. Kevin is right on target, as usual. Social media can have a big impact, but blogs provide advantages not possible through social media alone.

[A] blog is the only way you can demonstrate your knowledge, experience, and care. A blog establishes trust based on your empathy for your audience knowing what’s of value of to them.

A blog builds your influence in niche areas. First in the way we’ve always looked at influence, in a subjective way, ie, she’s an influence lawyer in the patent litigation arena. Second, and perhaps more importantly, influence for high rankings on Google, with its Hummingbird update.

There are any number of other advantages of blogging over other social media. Where do I go to find a record of your insight over the last three years without a blog? How do you share your ‘social media’ with a client via an email? I can strategically share a blog post by email. How do others cite you without a blog? How do people share your content without a blog?

In may last two trips to New York City I am seeing a growing trend in large law to focus on blogging at the expense of other social media/networks such as Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, and Google+.

Firms are seeing value in blogging. Blogging makes total sense to them. Leading lawyers have always written and spoken. Blogging feels like a natural extension of this form of business development.

Other forms of social media, though very effective as an adjunct to blogging, feel a little beneath a ‘lawyer’ to many firms. Right or wrong, they don’t want to jump into other social media right now.

Social media and blogs should complement and reinforce each other, but if you could only have one, most lawyers would probably be better off with blogs.

Is Security A Selling Point? Ask the Post Office

Does knowing how to use encryption and digital signatures when necessary give an advantage in the marketplace? Even 15 years ago some lawyers found this to be the case. With revelations of security breaches and systematic NSA monitoring, lawyers who know how to use encryption and its cousin, digital signatures, even more of a marketing advantage.

In an attempt to adjust to this new reality, the U.S. Postal Service has trademarked multiple encryption-related trade names:

One brand name filed Sept. 6, “United States Postal Service Digital Services,” would consist of, among other things, “tamper-detection capabilities” for safeguarding electronic documents, audio and videos.

A more generic “United States Digital Services” trademark, submitted for consideration on Aug. 16, would include fax transmissions “featuring encryption and decryption.”

The name also would cover “electronic mail services in the field of financial transactions,” which presumably could generate Wall Street sales for an agency that has lost $3.9 billion so far this fiscal year.

The filing proposes verifying the identities of people transmitting information — and, vice versa, confirming intended recipients have received unadulterated information — through a practice called “security printing.” The technique codes identification information on valuable documents and products.

Much more on this important issue later.

The New “Word of Mouth” Marketing

At the estimable Attorney at Work site, Mike Ramsey gives some great tips for monitoring your reputation in online media, but first, he explains why it is absolutely necessary:

A June 2013 study by BrightLocal found that almost 80 percent of consumers trusted online reviews as much as personal recommendations. With those numbers trending up each year, and the understanding that Google alone could be 10 times the size of the entire yellow pages industry, it is clear that online reviews have become the new word-of-mouth marketing. It is more important than ever to have clients spreading good news about you on review sites. If they aren’t, the haters will be.

Apps for Law Firm Marketing?

Ellen Freedman, author of PA Law Practice Management, is bullish on the idea of law firms developing custom apps for marketing. Others, like Kevin O’Keefe and Erik Mazzone, so much. Still others, like Dennis Kennedy, are in between.

It’ll be interesting to see how this all sorts out. My take?

We’ll see some white elephants in the beginning, like the first few law firm websites, a history chronicled in Law Law Law on the Internet, by Rick Klau and Erik Heels.

Law firms will probably be able to get a little traction from apps that make it easier for existing clients to interact with the law firm, possibly providing instructional items like many provide on their websites.

If law firms are able to break the code and come up with ways to provide real value to customers and potential customers, we will probably see very successful law firm apps.