Blogs v. Social Media

My friend Kevin O’Keefe’s Real Lawyers Have Blogs is a consistent source of good ideas about lawyer use of the Internet, with a post comparing the impact of social media and blogging a recent highlight. One anecdote in particular rings true:

One law firm marketing professional told me today that when he suggests Twitter with lawyers in his firm he gets a look like he is suggesting MySpace. In a presentation yesterday I asked an audience of about fifty lawyers how many use Twitter. One sheepishly raised his hand to shoulder height.

Some might discount Kevin’s perspective because his business supports blogs for lawyers. That would be a mistake. Kevin is right on target, as usual. Social media can have a big impact, but blogs provide advantages not possible through social media alone.

[A] blog is the only way you can demonstrate your knowledge, experience, and care. A blog establishes trust based on your empathy for your audience knowing what’s of value of to them.

A blog builds your influence in niche areas. First in the way we’ve always looked at influence, in a subjective way, ie, she’s an influence lawyer in the patent litigation arena. Second, and perhaps more importantly, influence for high rankings on Google, with its Hummingbird update.

There are any number of other advantages of blogging over other social media. Where do I go to find a record of your insight over the last three years without a blog? How do you share your ‘social media’ with a client via an email? I can strategically share a blog post by email. How do others cite you without a blog? How do people share your content without a blog?

In may last two trips to New York City I am seeing a growing trend in large law to focus on blogging at the expense of other social media/networks such as Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, and Google+.

Firms are seeing value in blogging. Blogging makes total sense to them. Leading lawyers have always written and spoken. Blogging feels like a natural extension of this form of business development.

Other forms of social media, though very effective as an adjunct to blogging, feel a little beneath a ‘lawyer’ to many firms. Right or wrong, they don’t want to jump into other social media right now.

Social media and blogs should complement and reinforce each other, but if you could only have one, most lawyers would probably be better off with blogs.

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