Monthly Archives: January 2014

When Cutting Edge Ideas Go Mainstream, Part II

When I predicted in my 1999 book, The Complete Internet Handbook for Lawyers that the Internet would make outsourcing of legal work to India popular, people thought I was nutty.

What a difference 10 years made. Now the New York Times reports:

The number of legal outsourcing companies in India has mushroomed to more than 140 at the end of 2009, from 40 in 2005, according to Valuenotes, a consulting firm in Pune, India. Revenue at India’s legal outsourcing firms is expected to grow to $440 million this year, up 38 percent from 2008, and should surpass $1 billion by 2014, Valuenotes estimates.

“This is not a blip, this is a big historical movement,” said David B. Wilkins, director of Harvard Law School’s program on the legal profession. “There is an increasing pressure by clients to reduce costs and increase efficiency,” he added, and with companies already familiar with outsourcing tasks like information technology work to India, legal services is a natural next step.

When Cutting Edge Ideas Go Mainstream, Part I

When I published Blogs as a Disruptive Technology in Law Practice magazine a decade ago, my thesis that many law firms would be better off building their websites with blog software than with conventional website design technology was considered by many to be sort of nutty.

I’m pleased to see that an article in Law Practice Today (the online version of Law Practice) shows that the idea has now become conventional wisdom:

Quickly Making a Professional-Looking Website

Future Looks Grim for Passwords as Security Mechanism

Dark Reading has a great explanation for why passwords provide less protection than they used to. Here’s an excerpt:

During the past half-decade, three factors have fueled a renaissance in password cracking. While password-recovery programs have gained immense computational power by offloading the intensive calculations of dictionary-based and brute-force guessing to off-the-shelf graphics processors, users continue to use the same mnemonics to create passwords that seem secure while being easily memorized. Yet the insecurity of websites — from LinkedIn to Stratfor and from RockYou to Sony — has given researchers real-world lists of millions of hashes from which to uncover the systems that people use to create their passwords.

The result is that, at the same time that the power of cracking programs has skyrocketed, researchers are smarter at guessing the ways that users might create passwords, whittling down the lists of possible passwords. By creating better word lists and more intelligent methods of mangling real words and phrases, hackers and researchers can make an untenable computational problem much more feasible, said Olga Koksharova, spokeswoman for password-recovery firm ElcomSoft, in an e-mail interview.