Monthly Archives: November 2013

User Frustration => Security Weaknesses => Breaches

User friendliness: An overlooked security enhancement. A study shows that frustrated users who circumvent security measures create  half of all security breaches:

As security measures become less user friendly, they also become less effective. Cyber security professionals estimate that almost half (49 percent) of all agency security breaches are caused by a lack of user compliance. …

Not only do end users experience challenges with the applications they use daily, many of the activities they must perform as part of their daily work also cause frustration. The activities that cyber security professionals say are the most likely to cause a security breach are the same activities where end users run into the most frustrating security measures. The top areas for cyber security professionals’ concern and end users’ frustration are surfing the internet, downloading files, accessing networks, and transferring files.

End users say cyber security measures hinder their productivity and as a result admit to breaking protocol. Sixty-six percent of end users believe the security protocols at their agency are burdensome and time-consuming. Sixty-nine percent say at least some portion of their work takes longer than it should due to security measures. Nearly one in five end users can recall an instance where they were unable to complete a work assignment on time because of a security measure. As a result, 31% of end users say they use some kind of security work around at least once a week.

Technethics or Same Old Ethics in Different Garb?

The Lawyerist article Astroturfing to Technethics, the New Vocabulary of Ethics explains several phrases gaining prominence as lawyers increasingly use technology. For example, “astroturfing” refers to phony positive user reviews.

In a comment, Carolyn Elefant takes exception to one of the terms, “technethics.” It arguably implies that technology creates a new standard for judging ethics conduct:

 [T]he ethics of social media are no different from ethics in the real world – the same rules apply in the ethics sphere. Once we start creating categories for special use rules, we make it more difficult for lawyers to use their discretion to evaluate the rules and determine how they apply – and instead, will have them wait for the bars to issue guidance, which as I’ve blogged at MyShingle is foolhardy.

The New “Word of Mouth” Marketing

At the estimable Attorney at Work site, Mike Ramsey gives some great tips for monitoring your reputation in online media, but first, he explains why it is absolutely necessary:

A June 2013 study by BrightLocal found that almost 80 percent of consumers trusted online reviews as much as personal recommendations. With those numbers trending up each year, and the understanding that Google alone could be 10 times the size of the entire yellow pages industry, it is clear that online reviews have become the new word-of-mouth marketing. It is more important than ever to have clients spreading good news about you on review sites. If they aren’t, the haters will be.